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3 edition of Selection for water-use efficiency in grain legumes found in the catalog.

Selection for water-use efficiency in grain legumes

G. C. Wright

Selection for water-use efficiency in grain legumes

Report of a workshop held at ICRISAT Centre, Patancheru, Andhra Pradesh, India, 5-7 May 1993..

by G. C. Wright

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  • 28 Currently reading

Published by Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research in Canberra .
Written in English


Edition Notes

SeriesACIAR Technical Reports -- 27
ContributionsAustralian Centre for International Agricultural Research., Nageswara Rao R.C.
The Physical Object
Pagination70p.p.
Number of Pages70
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18204431M
ISBN 101863201025
OCLC/WorldCa31332986

Plant breeders of field crops have traditionally used multi-environment trials to select among advanced breeding lines for adaptation either to unpredictable target environments or to a range of partially controlled, mainly irrigated, environments. This approach is expensive, difficult to interpret and has resulted in only modest gains in drought prone by: 1. Biomass production, soil water extraction, and water-use efficiency (WUE, kg dry matter (DM)/ growing-season water use) of tropical, summer-growing and temperate, winter-growing forage legumes suited to short-term rotations with crops were compared over several growing seasons in southern Queensland. Tropical legumes lablab (Lablab purpureus cvv. Highworth and Endurance), burgundy Cited by:

This book presents the most comprehensive and up to date review of research on different cool season grain legume crops, nutrients management, biotic and abiotic stresses management, agronomical approaches for drought management, salinity, drought, weed management and water use efficiency, impact on international trade around the world. The grain legumes are grown mainly as pulses providing food for humans, while pasture legumes are cultivated to feed domestic animals. Based on plant utility and economy, legumes are categorized into major and minor species. Major legumes are popular and common with well-established domestication and cultivation, agronomic practices Author: Jacob Popoola, Omena Ojuederie, Conrad Omonhinmin, Adegoke Adegbite.

(). Grain yield, harvest index and water use of wheat. (). Heritability in standard units. (). Rapid assessment of specific leaf area and leaf nitrogen in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) using a chlorophyll meter. (). Selection for water-use efficiency in grain legumes".Author: A Cruickshank and. et al. suppressants on water use efficiency and grain yield of perlmillet reported by Dahiya and Singh (). Plant density per unit area is another important factor governing yield of rainfed crops. Bhardwaj et al. () and Pal and Kaushik () suggested that a row .


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Selection for water-use efficiency in grain legumes by G. C. Wright Download PDF EPUB FB2

Wright and Nageswara Rao () implemented this sort of approach in selecting for improved water-use efficiency in grain legumes, following initial studies identifying genetic variability in. Selection for Water-use Efficiency in Grain Legumes Report of a workshop held at ICRISAT Centre, Andhra Pradesh, India, May Editors: G.C.

Wright and R.C. Nageswara Rao 1 ' ww DIPAITMIWT 01 ICAR ICRISAT - maum WWl~ ICRISAT v -- L fo SS - ~rom pRr om 1 1 XI 96 FOR APPROVAL. Selection for water-use efficiency in grain legumes: report of a workshop held at ICRISAT Centre, Andhra Pradesh, India, May Author: G C Wright ; R C Nageswara Rao ; International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics.

Selection for water-use efficiency in grain legumes; Go to top of page Primary tabs. View published (active tab) What links here; Subscribe. First Name (**) Last Name (**) Email Address (**) Leave this field blank.

Share this. Print the page; Selection for water-use efficiency in grain legumes. Report of a workshop held at ICRISAT. Wright, G C and Rao, R C N () Selection for water-use efficiency in grain legumes.

In: Selection for Water-use Efficiency in Grain Legumes Report of a workshop, MayICRISAT Patancheru, India. Selection for water-use efficiency in grain legumes. By G C Wright and R C N Rao. Get PDF (2 MB) ACIAR and ICRISAT scientists involved in the collaborative research on water use efficiency (WUE) in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) and grain legumes.

(Arachis hypogaea) and grain legumes. The 14 papers presented at the workshop are grouped Author: G C Wright and R C N Rao. Selection for water use efficiency in food legumes. Wright, G.C. Dr; Ph: (07) ; Fax: (07) ; [email protected] Research organisation: Queensland Department of Primary Industries, Farming Systems Institute, PO Kingaroy Qld Sponsor: ACIAR: Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research Objectives.

efficiency (WUE). It is highly appropriate that we meet to discuss this topic, particularly metho­ dologies for selection of grain legume genotypes with high water use efficiency.

Or McOonald has. Water use efficiencies for dry matter production (WUE dm) of up to 30 kg ha −1 mm −1 for V. faba and V. narbonensis at Merredin, and water use efficiencies for grain yield (WUE gr) of up to 16 kg ha −1 mm −1 for P.

sativum and 13 kg ha −1 mm −1 for V. faba at Mullewa, were comparable to those reported for cereals and other grain legumes in previous studies in this and other by: Plant breeding over the last century has indirectly increased water use efficiency of the major grain crops because yield has increased with no additional water use.

These increases have been substantial in all major food by: Legume crops used 10 to 25% more seasonal water than wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) across environments, but WUE (kg dry matter ha −1 mm −1 of water) of legumes was 0 to 25% greater than that of wheat.

Green-manure and forage legumes generally had greater water use and WUE than grain legumes, and this was associated with their longer growing season and higher dry matter.

To make informed decisions on whether to include legumes in cropping systems, information is needed on water use by legumes and its effect on soil water availability to subsequent crops.

The objectives of this study were to determine the water use, water use efficiency (WUE), and soil water depletion pattern of four grain legumes and three. Grain Legumes – Foreword ii Foreword selection GCDT Global Crop Diversity Trust WUE Water Use Efficiency. Grain Legumes – Executive Summary 1 Executive Summary The CGIAR Research Program (CRP) on Grain Legumes unites research-for-development (R4D) efforts.

We completed a global meta-analysis of published literature that contains both a measure of leaf nitrogen content and a measure of leaf water use efficiency for agricultural legumes: Cajanus cajan (pigeon pea), Cicer arietinum (chick pea), Glycine max (soybean), Lens culinaris (lentil), Lupinus by: 7.

WAteR uSe effiCienCy of GRAin CRopS in AuStRAliA| 25 | GRDC potentially increase water use efficiency from kg/ha/mm with current farmer practice to kg/ha/mm. Combining improved nitrogen nutrition with early sowing and high plant density lifted water use efficiency further to File Size: 2MB.

K.H.M. Siddique, K.L. Regan, D. Tennant, and B.D. Thomson (). Water use and water use efficiency of cool season grain legumes in low rainfall Mediterranean-type environment. Eur J Agron 15(4), – CrossRef Google ScholarCited by: The intrinsic water use efficiency (WUE) of crop legumes is generally greater than that of non-legume crops, but we make poor use of this knowledge in agriculture.

Breeding programs for legumes, with well-defined goals and trait metrics, could greatly enhance the WUE of current global by: 7. Water use efficiency (WUE), the ratio of grain yield to crop water use, provides a simple means of assessing whether yield is limited by water supply or other factors.

Based on this assessment, yields of commercial dryland wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) crops in. improves water use efficiency. Nevertheless, grain legumes remain poor cousins to the major cereal crops (rice, wheat, maize) due to the ever-increasing global demand for cereals from increasing human populations.

Globally, the priorities for cultivation, research and development in grain legumes remain secondary to those for. Nitrogen fixation potential and residual effects of selected grain legumes in a Kenyan soil George N. Chemining’wa water use efficiency and were comparable to the local checks (common bean (variety Katumani ) and nitrogen residual effects is critical in the selection of legumes for integration into the low nitrogen maize.

Water use efficiency (WUE) is defined as the amount of carbon assimilated as biomass or grain produced per unit of water used by the crop. One of the primary questions being asked is how plants will respond to a changing climate with changes in temperature, precipitation, and carbon dioxide (CO 2) that affect their WUE At the leaf level, increasing CO 2 increases WUE until the leaf is exposed Cited by:   Improving Water use Efficiency of Annual Crops in the Rainfed Farming Systems of West Asia and North Africa - Volume 23 Issue 2 - P.

J. M. Cooper, P. J. Gregory, D. Tully, H. C. HarrisCited by:   Thus, it is crucial to understand traits influencing water uptake and the efficiency of using water to produce biomass. Global comparisons and comparisons at specific locations reveal that water use of different grain legumes is very similar, which indicates that water use efficiency varies over a wide range due to differences in biomass and by: 6.